Portfolio

The technical writing portfolio of Kayce Basques.

This is a comprehensive, roughly chronological list of everything I've created as a technical writer.

Google (2015 to Present)

Chrome DevTools

General:

Network:

Accessibility:

Simulating Mobile Devices:

JavaScript:

Performance Optimization:

CSS:

Release Notes:

Workbox

Security

Lighthouse

Quantified Code (2014)

Quantified Code was a Berlin-based startup. Their main product was an automated code analysis tool for Python codebases. I wrote over 100 guides for their companion site, The Little Book Of Python Anti-Patterns. The purpose of the companion site was to share their knowledge of Python best practices while also driving traffic to their automated product. E.g. their sales pitch was "rather than trying to remember all of these best practices, we have an automated tool that can do it for you." Subject matter experts at Quantified Code gave me a list of topics to write about. If I recall correctly, each topic only had a one-line description. I researched and drafted each guide myself. The subject matter experts reviewed my guides.

We were completely happy with Kayce's work. He was a great, professional communicator and he knows how 
            to manage and deliver projects. He wrote about 100 technical articles for us. Especially, as the 
            programming language he was writing about, was new to him, we were impressed by the quality and the 
            thoroughness of his investigations. Also, Kayce should flexibility when we were busy and had to pause the 
            assignment for a bit. Fully recommended. Happy to work with him again.
Figure 1. The review that the Quantified Code people left me.

Note that the list below is not complete. It looks like some of the guides were deleted over time. See my commit history for the full list of contributions.

Arrayent (2012 to 2015)

Arrayent was an internet of things startup. I was the sole technical writer in the company. This was my first full-time technical writing job. I wrote developer documentation for an embedded API as well as a REST API, in addition to end-user documentation for a couple of web applications. I even hacked together a custom XSLT stylesheet to convert our Doxygen-generated reference documentation to more reasonable HTML. I also migrated the company's documentation from Microsoft Word to a website. I used Sphinx to generate the site and stored the source code on BitBucket. I deployed the site to Heroku. I don't think I set up an automated deployment system because running the command to deploy to Heroku was trivial. In addition to managing all of our customer-facing documentation I also managed our SDKs, which we sent out to prospective customers.

Embedded Developer Docs:

Web Developer Docs:

Web App User Docs: